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Jet liner meets tornado, jetliner meets ground - Eastern US Weather Forums

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Jet liner meets tornado, jetliner meets ground


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#1 SkyOdyssey

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 12:14 PM

Quote

NLM Cityhopper Flight 431 was a short range passenger flight departing Rotterdam Airport (RTM) in Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands, scheduled for arrival at Eindhoven Airport (EIN) in Eindhoven, North Brabant, Netherlands, late on the afternoon of Tuesday, 6 October 1981. Eindhoven was a stopover before final arrival at Hamburg Airport (HAM) in Hamburg, Germany.

The Fokker F28 Fellowship 4000 jet took off at 5:04 pm CET (UTC +1). At 5:09 pm, the crew noted heavy rain in thunderstorms on the weather avoidance radar and received clearance to avoid the area. At 5:12 pm the aircraft entered a tornado whilst flying through clouds. The stress resulted in loads increasing to +6.8 g and -3.2 g. The right wing separated, there was in-flight breakup, and the aircraft crashed out of control from 3000 ft (900 m) near Moerdijk in the southwestern Netherlands. Flight 431 went down 15 miles (24 km) south-southeast of Rotterdam, killing all 17 aboard.

The disintegrating airliner was seen exiting cloudcover. A police officer first photographed the tornado, then smoke from the burning plane a few minutes later. An investigation concluded that a sharp increase in altitude registered on the altimeter was not a change in altitude, rather a pressure drop associated with the tornado.


#2 dendrite

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 12:23 PM

"The disintegrating airliner was seen exiting cloudcover. A police officer first photographed the tornado, then smoke from the burning plane a few minutes later."

Anyone ever seen these images online?

#3 Ytterbium.

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 12:42 PM

Wow... a tornado in Holland! Must be related to global warming.

#4 Cool Spruce

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 04:34 PM

View PostYtterbium., on Apr 9 2006, 01:42 PM, said:

Wow... a tornado in Holland! Must be related to global warming.


I'm not getting the part about where this is funny :thumbsdownsmileyanim:

#5 Ytterbium.

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 06:24 PM

View PostCool Spruce, on Apr 9 2006, 05:34 PM, said:

I'm not getting the part about where this is funny :thumbsdownsmileyanim:


The Dutch aren't exactly known for their tornadoes.

#6 SkyOdyssey

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 06:39 PM

Netherlands actually has more tornadoes per area than any other country, in fact, they have more tornadoes per area than the states of Oklahoma and Florida. They do also occasionally have strong tornadoes (whereas they're very rare in the UK).

#7 WidreMann

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 06:39 PM

View PostYtterbium., on Apr 9 2006, 06:24 PM, said:

The Dutch aren't exactly known for their tornadoes.

So? They do get tornadoes in other places of the world with some regularity. The US still gets most of them, but you have to remember that getting thousands a year is a lot. If Europe gets 100s a year, that'd still be significantly less than the US, but it would still mean that tornadoes aren't unheard of in Europe.

NB: I don't actually know Europe tornado stats off the top of my head, but I do know they aren't that rare there and in other parts of the world.

#8 Cool Spruce

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 06:40 PM

View PostYtterbium., on Apr 9 2006, 07:24 PM, said:

The Dutch aren't exactly known for their tornadoes.


Agreed. That's what I thought. But now that you bring it up, I have to ask if any one has any idea why now, all of a sudden. Even though I am a believer in warming, I honestly hadn't thought of that as a reason for this tornado. Unless they're having an extremely hot spring? Hadn't been paying attention.

It is only in recent years I was even aware that tornadoes happen outside of North America.

#9 SaCaCh

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 06:51 PM

Quote

afternoon of Tuesday, 6 October 1981


um...

#10 Cool Spruce

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 07:18 PM

View PostSaCaCh, on Apr 9 2006, 07:51 PM, said:

um...


Oops.
Embarassment smiley. Well, that did slip by.

#11 WidreMann

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 09:54 PM

View PostCool Spruce, on Apr 9 2006, 07:18 PM, said:

Oops.
Embarassment smiley. Well, that did slip by.

I don't get it.

#12 Cool Spruce

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 03:22 PM

View PostWidreMann, on Apr 9 2006, 10:54 PM, said:

I don't get it.

It was just brought to our attention that the original poster was quoting a 1981 article, or at least, an article about a tornado in 1981. Not that it matters much, I guess. A tornado in the Netherlands is still a tornado--

#13 SkyOdyssey

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 07:52 PM

Yeah, this was back in 1981 but isn't well known. Tim Vasquez (former USAF forecaster, owner of Weather Graphics, and in charge of Stormtrack online, heard of another *possible* accident involving a small plane in Kansas years ago, but that's all I know of aircraft entering tornadoes. Research planes were driven through nonsupercellular waterspouts in the 70s, a different entity altogether. The g-loading on the Fokker F28-4000 was astounding. It recorded 10 g which ripped it apart, 0.5 g - 1.5 g classifies as severe turbulence, >1.5 g as very severe, and enough to make aircraft exceedingly difficult to fly and possibly cause structural damage.


As for Netherlands and tornadoes, there have been a number of strong tornadoes there. Overall, Netherlands has the highest density of annual tornadoes (number per area) of any nation, even higher than the states of Florida and Oklahoma. The UK used to be thought number one per area based on data decades old, but new data shows it is definitely the Netherlands. Additionally, almost all UK tornadoes are weak with strong tornadoes being very rare.

France doesn't report many tornadoes relative to neighboring areas, but the intensity distribution indicates they're more intense than other areas. Italy has quite a few in a couple active regions, including some strong tornadoes. Germany and Israel had damaging supercellular tornadoes in just the last couple weeks.

I posted work on European tornadoes in another thread, but it sorta got lost. Here is some good work:
Also of interest are ESSL, Estofex, TorDACH, and TORRO, for European tornado information. Check out the comprehensive Wikpedia article listing major global tornado events for some specific European events throughout history, as well as good resources linked at the bottom. Strong to violent tornadoes occur worldwide. There have been very large tornadoes, very long-track tornadoes, violent tornadoes, extremely destructive tornadoes, and tornadoes have killed hundreds in the past in Europe. Thousands have been killed in India and Bangladesh, where there is a short season in a relatively small area that is likely comparable to the US for violent tornadoes.

Tornado distributions are relatively similar worldwide. The higher number of intense tornadoes in the U.S. is partly due to the higher number of tornadoes overall, currently averaging about 1200 reports per year (estimated total mean on the order of 500 higher). The Netherlands reports an average of 20 tornadoes per year with an estimated total of 35 counting "missed" events, plus 60 waterspouts annually (estimated total of 100). All in an area of 41,526 km² (16,033 mi²). That said, the Dutch come to the US for most of their storm chasing ;-) --not that there are many. The European reported annual average is 329 and the estimated total is 697.





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