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Question: what is a MILLER A??? - Eastern US Weather Forums

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Question: what is a MILLER A???


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#1 frax83

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 06:33 PM

Sorry, i'm Italian so i don't know "American weather slang"... I read this expression many times and i think it deals with snowstorms... Right?
Here's a slang expression in Italian, about weather:
BOMBA BIANCA...White Bomb (a massive snowstorm!).
And in Italian weather boards people use to give animal names to baric systems! :lol: For example: the cold high pressure that forms in Russia and sometimes push bitter cold air from E-NE in Europe is called "Orso Russo..Russian Bear"; the high pressure from SW, so from Northern Africa, we call it "Cammello...Camel"; and we call the high from Azzorre "Maiale...Pig"!
CIAO!

#2 Ender

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 06:58 PM

It's not slang. :)

Basically a Miller-A is a noreaster that starts in the gulf coast of the US whereas a Miller-B is one that generally dives down from Canada through, or west, of the US/Canadian Great Lakes then redevelops off the US east coast anywhere from the VA/NC border to (more typically) just off the NJ coast.

Yes, for the most part people refer to the millers as snow events, but they do not have to result in snow. A "wasted noreaster" (or miller A/B) is every weenie's worst nightmare.

#3 Ender

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 07:05 PM

BTW: noreaster is a low that tracks along and generally parallel to the US east coast. They can be right on the coastal plain (BAD!), just off coast or well off the coast. Since Miller-Bs tend to start re-developing from VA/NC northward, but usually DE/NJ northward, their greatest impacts tend to be felt in New England with less likelyhood of a major impact the further south you go. Since they form in the Gulf, Miller-A's can bring a historic snowfalls to the entire US East Coast, actually a lot more territory than that.

#4 zwyts

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 07:29 PM

Frax...Ender pretty much answers your question

Miller B's(The bane of DC existence) are when a low pressure moves to the spine of the Appalachian Mtns and then redevelops off the Atlantic Coast.....somewhere from South Carolina to NJ

Miller A's have only ONE primary Surface low usually from the GOM

It might center jump, but it doesnt redevelop hundreds of miles away and Southeast of the the initial low

#5 Dave

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 07:41 PM

Check this site out... It's very informative.

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/akq/wx_events/w...ww/slide15.html

#6 Icestorm2

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 07:42 PM

View Postfrax83, on Dec 22 2005, 06:33 PM, said:

Sorry, i'm Italian so i don't know "American weather slang"... I read this expression many times and i think it deals with snowstorms... Right?
Here's a slang expression in Italian, about weather:
BOMBA BIANCA...White Bomb (a massive snowstorm!).
And in Italian weather boards people use to give animal names to baric systems! :lol: For example: the cold high pressure that forms in Russia and sometimes push bitter cold air from E-NE in Europe is called "Orso Russo..Russian Bear"; the high pressure from SW, so from Northern Africa, we call it "Cammello...Camel"; and we call the high from Azzorre "Maiale...Pig"!
CIAO!


FA BRUTTA!

#7 snownado ROA

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 09:49 PM

So, who was Miller, and why did he get all these cyclogenesis scenarios named for him? Nobody's ever answered that for me.

#8 Huffwx

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 10:56 PM

Miller,..Dr?? Named the 2 types,

#9 Catullus

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 12:22 AM

View Postsnownado ROA, on Dec 22 2005, 09:49 PM, said:

So, who was Miller, and why did he get all these cyclogenesis scenarios named for him? Nobody's ever answered that for me.



The types come from a paper that James Miller had published in 1946: "Cyclogenesis in the Atlantic Coastal Region of the United States." I posted the following once on WWBB but post it again here:

These desigantions were coined in 1946 by James Miller in the paper "Cyclogenesis in the Atlantic Coastal Region of the United States."

Miller on Type-A cyclones:

Type A.- Type A appears as a cyclone wave along the front of a cold outbreak. This type of cyclogenesis is not peculiar to the Atlantic coastal region or even east coasts in general. It is a common occurence in regions where cold outbreaks occur frequently, but it is most often observed along east coasts in the colder part of the year. At the tiemof origin of a type-A cyclone in the Atlantic coastal region the characteristic features of the surface weather map are:

1. A cold anticyclcone covering most of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains.
2. A cold, continental airmass flowing off the continent.
3. A current of warm, maritime air from a southerly or southeasterly direction in the western Atlantic, associated with a more or less well developed warm anticyclone and opposed to the offshore flow of cold air.
4. A retardation of a portion of the cold front in such a way that the front is distorted into a wave form.
5. A spreading of middle clouds and precipitation over the retarded portion of the cold wedge.

Type-A cyclones generally originate over the ocean and move in a northeasterly direction so that in many cases they do not have much impact on the weather of coastal stations.




Miller on Type-B cyclones:

Type B.- Type-B originates near the coast line to the southeast of an older cyclone. Its point of origin is along the warm front, or what appears to be the warm front, of the older storm. There is some reason to believe that this type is not as common in other parts of the world and owes its frequency to the peculiar topography of North America. It is not often recognized elsewhere and not always recognized in this region. In many cases detailed study of a close network of observations is necessary to identify type B; consequently the historical northern hemisphere maps, having been anaylzed from an open network, sometimes do not distinguish between the primary cyclone and the secondary that forms near it. The characteristics of type-B are:

1. An occluding or occluded primary cyclone in the region of the great lakes, nearly stationary or moving northeastword.
2. A shallow wedge of cold continental air and associated pressure wedge, lying between the Appalachian Mountains and the Gulf Stream, the wedge line oriented southwestward from a cold anticyclone centered in eastern Canada or over the Grand Banks and crossing the 45th partallel near longitude 68 W. The shallow, cold airmass is sluggish and tends to remain along the coast during cyclogenesis.
3. A warm, maritime airmass flowing northward against the sluggish cold wedge, creating and maintaining a frontal discontinuity between the two airmasses.
4. A spreading of middle clouds and precipitation over the cold wedge, partially separated from the cold and precipitation area of the primary cyclone.
5. A local area of falling pressure dissociated from the isallobaric minimum preceding the primary cyclone, but associated with the front of the cold wedge in the region where the airmass contrast and the convergence are the greatest. The cyclone forms in this area.

As this cyclone type originates near the coast line and usually moves northeastward it affects the coastal weather much more frequently than does type-A.


Note that this is taken from Miller (1946), which appeared in Vol. 4 of J. of Meterorology. An updated scheme was produced in the early nineties by Davis et al in (1993).

#10 frax83

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 08:20 AM

Thank you all!
Now i know smtgh more! ;)
Hope u'll get all the MILLERS you want and need during this winter!!!
CIAO!
Francesco

#11 ETauntonMA

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 08:29 AM

View Postfrax83, on Dec 22 2005, 06:33 PM, said:

Sorry, i'm Italian so i don't know "American weather slang"... I read this expression many times and i think it deals with snowstorms... Right?
Here's a slang expression in Italian, about weather:
BOMBA BIANCA...White Bomb (a massive snowstorm!).
And in Italian weather boards people use to give animal names to baric systems! :lol: For example: the cold high pressure that forms in Russia and sometimes push bitter cold air from E-NE in Europe is called "Orso Russo..Russian Bear"; the high pressure from SW, so from Northern Africa, we call it "Cammello...Camel"; and we call the high from Azzorre "Maiale...Pig"!
CIAO!


God's gift to East Coasters for snowstorms if there is enough cold air. :thumbsupsmileyanim:





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