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Thunderstorm days per year - Eastern US Weather Forums

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Thunderstorm days per year


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#1 cromartie

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:53 PM

Found this graphic on the web tonight and it kind of surprised me. Its weird to think I get as many thunderstorm days as parts of TX and OK. Also surprised on the amount of t-storms that south Texas, western Kansas, central and western Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota and New England get (SE Maine gets a big screwjob). I thought those areas got more than whats indicated on this map. Weird to think I get more t-storm days than more severe weather prone plains areas. Also weird with South Texas as their t-storm season is basically year round.

Oh well, interesting graphic, nonetheless.

Posted Image

#2 Ytterbium.

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:06 PM

That's surprising.

#3 turtlehurricane

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:10 PM

Not terribly surprising. When a squall hits Texas it usually stretches all the way up there. As for the areas that don't get much, just look at where the Gulf of Mexico is situated. It's all about having the moisture AND the dynamics, if you're missing one of the two, you have nothing.

#4 SacrydDreamz

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:10 PM

So far as west Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and eastern Colorado is concerned, a big issue for them is the dryline during severe weather season. Oftentimes they get caught behind the dryline while areas further east will "enjoy" isolated/scattered thunderstorms -- note the tongue of higher thunderstorm occurrence in the eastern sections of these same states (sans CO)...

The Dakotas often find themselves outside of the warm sector, so really it isn't that surprising -- but tornado frequency is probably higher than areas of New England with the same thunderstorm frequency.

Notice the higher value from the Gulf coast into the Great Lakes region? Likely due in part to nocturnal thunderstorms with the low-level jet that often develops across this region in the summer.

Now, when it comes to SEVERE storms, I would anticipate western sections of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas to see a higher percentage of their thunderstorms meeting severe criteria relative to other areas with the same thunderstorm frequency. Same is true for the Dakotas relative to New England -- Any other thoughts?

#5 msp

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:12 PM

The part that sticks out to me is the very low amounts across nw KS and central/western NE. I had figured that they'd have more than places like Maryland or western NY.

#6 cromartie

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:22 PM

View Postpman, on Jan 4 2008, 09:12 PM, said:

The part that sticks out to me is the very low amounts across nw KS and central/western NE. I had figured that they'd have more than places like Maryland or western NY.


I totally agree there. Thats the areas where you usually see the big supercells firing in summertime. I just can't believe I get 40-50 days of t-storms a year here. Certainly doesn't feel like it.

I could use a t-storm right now. :thumbsup:

#7 bowtie`

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:35 PM

Interesting map. Just where did you get that? Did they specify just what the sample size. criteria and length of the data set was? That all makes a difference on the final outcome. Western Alabama / Eastern Georgia and the middle third of Arkansas are spots that are interesting to me.

#8 Aleking

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:39 PM

looks pretty much as expected to me.

#9 cromartie

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:48 PM

View Postbowtie`, on Jan 4 2008, 09:35 PM, said:

Interesting map. Just where did you get that? Did they specify just what the sample size. criteria and length of the data set was? That all makes a difference on the final outcome. Western Alabama / Eastern Georgia and the middle third of Arkansas are spots that are interesting to me.


Just stumbled across it on the web. Here's another, looks kinda different:

Posted Image

#10 turtlehurricane

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:51 PM

We usually don't have much winter weather but, we sure as heck are the summer weather capital of the U.S. by far! :weight_lift:

#11 33Rain

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:52 PM

Do people on the west coast make a "milk and bread run" if a thunderstorm is in the forecast?

#12 cromartie

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:53 PM

Here's the world.

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Time to move to central Africa.

#13 33Rain

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:02 PM

View Postturtlehurricane, on Jan 4 2008, 10:51 PM, said:

We usually don't have much winter weather but, we sure as heck are the summer weather capital of the U.S. by far! :weight_lift:


As long as Midwest is on a roll... what about lightning strikes?

#14 aslkahuna

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:14 PM

Sierra Vista is in that orange and small red area in southern Arizona. Here at the house over the past 20 years we have averaged 87.9 observed thunderstorms with 65 thunderstorm days per year. The second graphic does not include Douglas or Fort Huachuca data so has a too small number for us down here.

Steve

#15 SacrydDreamz

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:15 PM

View Postmidwest_snow, on Jan 4 2008, 10:22 PM, said:

I totally agree there. Thats the areas where you usually see the big supercells firing in summertime. I just can't believe I get 40-50 days of t-storms a year here. Certainly doesn't feel like it.

I could use a t-storm right now. :thumbsup:


Those big supercells you see are often isolated/scattered -- not widespread. Furthermore, western KS/NE will end up on the west side of a dryline many times and fail to see any thunderstorm development while sections further east get nailed.

#16 AtticaFanatica

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:20 PM

It's really not that surprising. OK/TX/KS are not known for thunderstorms, they're known for supercells, significant tornadoes, and violent tornadoes, phenomena that occur far more often in the Plains than in WI.

#17 kevbo81

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:25 PM

in the first graphic, look at the little blip over eastern ny and western MA

weird

#18 jwcalla

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:31 PM

View Postmidwest_snow, on Jan 4 2008, 10:53 PM, said:

Here's the world.

Posted Image

Time to move to central Africa.


That's surprises me a bit; I didn't think Europe had many thunderstorms at all.

#19 SacrydDreamz

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:33 PM

View Postkevbo81, on Jan 4 2008, 11:25 PM, said:

in the first graphic, look at the little blip over eastern ny and western MA

weird


It doesn't appear to be that significant in size.... perhaps a topographical effect?


What's even more cool is the local maxima downstream of Philadelphia and Harrisburg, PA

#20 SacrydDreamz

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:35 PM

View Postjwcalla, on Jan 4 2008, 11:31 PM, said:

That's surprises me a bit; I didn't think Europe had many thunderstorms at all.


They don't have as many severe storms or tornadoes, but thunderstorms are common.... just as common as in southern Canada, the northern plains, and New England.... Remember that Europe has the Mediterranean to draw from as well as a diverse topography...





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